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ABOVE: Sealink reminders aboard Express Milos in the C Deck cabin area. On the left, a ''Way Out' sign in the British Rail corporate 'Rail alphabet' typeface remains in place. The second picture is a relic of the Dover-Dunkirk train ferry route - a sticker in virtually perfect condition inside one of the cabins.
Further details of the following areas are available on separate pages:
General overview
The A Deck Britannia Bar and Verandah Bar
The A Deck Cafeteria
The B Deck Forward Lounge
The B Deck Side Lounges
The B Deck Aft Garage (later Aft lounge)
Outside Deck Space
The Train/Vehicle decks
See also:
The complete 1985 Vortigern deckplan
For use mainly on the Dunkerque route, Vortigern was equipped with 22 2-berth standard cabins below the train/vehicle deck on C Deck. In addition, there were 2 'luxury' 2-berth passenger cabins up on A Deck, amidships on the port side. Those on the lower decks were all below the waterline so even those on the outside did not have any portholes, and none were fitted with en-suite facilities.

In 1986, as
Vortigern's English Channel career drew to a close, Sealink considered various alternatives for their ship and after the Channel Islands joint venture with Channel Island Ferries fell through, she was offerred to the new BCIF for the summer Weymouth service. It was the lack of enough good cabin accommodation which was cited by BCIF management as a reason for their declining this opportunity - in the event the role went to former Boulogne competitor Baroness M (once Normandy Ferries' Lion).

These original cabins survived virtually untouched in Greek service where they were available to economic class passengers for many years, although they seem to have been little used. When the ship was with Saos Ferries, these cabins were officially taken out of use.

This area was accessed via the central lobby on the lower passenger deck (originally B Deck).
ABOVE: A cabin of similar design aboard Express Milos in 2001, complete with original Sealink fittings. From 1970 all new-build Sealink ships used a standard component-based cabin design of modular construction which could be arranged to provide single, double or four berth layouts and utilised standard components and fittings (from ashtrays to light switches). Aboard Vortigern, many of the fittings were wooden, but on later ships plastic and laminate surfaces were more common.
matt@hhvferry.com
ABOVE: A cabin of the type found aboard Vortigern beneath the car/train decks in a Sealink publicity picture from the early 1970s.
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e-mail: matt@hhvferry.com