ON BOARD SENLAC: GENERAL OVERVIEW & MISCELLANY
matt@hhvferry.com
Above: A simple deckplan of Hengist/Horsa as they were when introduced in 1972. For the third ship, Senlac, the layout was identical apart from the arrangement of the shopping area on B Deck (a walk-through arcade as opposed to the self-service Duty Free shop of the 'H ships') and the restaurant/cafeteria on A Deck (a completely revised scheme with a port-side galley alongside a long starboard-side space with cafetera aft and restaurant forward).

For a more detailed and comprehensive plan of this class of ship, see the original
Hengist General Arrangement plan.

In Greek service, the forward lounges have been reserved for distinguished class passengers, although the lower of the two appears to alternate depending on demand. Together with the restaurant, these areas are in theory carefully guarded by crew, whilst all other areas are available for all passengers.

Beneath the car decks, the ship was equipped with passenger cabins for 24 passengers - these remain in passenger use today, being available to economic class passengers. Distinguished class passengers instead have the luxury of the former officers' cabins forward on the Boat Deck, which have now been opened up for passenger use.
Click here to return to the Senlac index
Below: Even on the occasions that a ship has been severely refitted in later years, there are almost always clues to be found of a former life - such is the case on Senlac today as Express Apollon. Although much of the original fittings have been removed, the main artworks remain (in the shape of the Belsky Mural and the bas relief panels in the restaurants). Signage is always something that tends to linger, often for decades or more - in the example below from adjacent to the entrance to the cafeteria can be seen a British Rail-era sign with reference to 'Sealink Shops', the non-smoking lounge (a reference to the aft lounge on B Deck), and a TV/Video Lounge (the orignal disco and long-since removed). This picture was taken in 2000 - sadly a Hellas Ferries refit in 2001/2002 saw this finally removed. (Picture courtesy Richard Seville)
Below: Bizarrely, even though the ship regularly carries passenger's pets in her domestic trade to and from the Greek islands, Express Apollon retains this large Rabies warning sign in one of her aft stairwells, even with additional Greek translation!
Below: Away from the main passenger spaces, old signs are even more common - this is a warning for motorists in one of the car deck stairwells, in English and French.
Further details of the following areas are available on separate pages:

The B Deck Forward Lounge, the forward lobbies & the Belsky mural
The B Deck Side lounges, Shopping arcade & Tea Bar
The B Deck Aft Bar, disco & aft lobby
The A Deck Forward Bar & Coffee Lounge
The A Deck cafeteria and restaurant
Outside deck space
Below: This picture shows the view from the alleyway linking the aft bar and the main lobby (looking forward through the starboard side lounge). The Aft Entrance sign refers to the doors on either beam of the lobby which used to connect to the gangways at Newhaven/Dieppe.
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e-mail: matt@hhvferry.com